Kaepernick–Right for the wrong reasons

This past week, the sports world has been in an uproar over the refusal of San Francisco 49er quarterback Colin Kaepernick to stand for the national anthem.   Cries of treason and ungratefulness have come from various circles.  Kaepernick for his part stated the following:

“This country stands for freedom, liberty and justice for all and that’s just not happening right now.”

The controversy has been dusted up only a few weeks after U.S. gymnast Gabby Douglas was criticized for not putting her hand over her heart during the medal ceremony for the All-Around gymnastics title for women at Olympic Games in Rio.  What are we to make over this issue?  Is it right to stand for the anthem and not pay respect for the country?

Kaepernick should have been paying attention for what the American government has done for the many years to our liberties, yet he has been oblivious to the fact that the government has not stood for freedom, justice and liberty for ANYBODY and not just for African-Americans only.   In fact, the liberties that the country has had in the past have been slowly eroding for the past 100 years.  Our interventions during the world wars, the Cold War and the War on Terror have cost us massive amounts of money, an increase of government that dominates all areas of our lives and a general decline of our cultural mores.

Up until just a few years ago, many football games were first opened with prayer and invocations were done by various officials and God was honored.  As you can see about five minutes into this video of the 1966 Gator Bowl, prayer came before the anthem.  With various Supreme Court decisions over the years, prayers at college and high school games have been banned in the name of the First Amendment.  It seems that nationalism is the new religion and that refusal to stand is tantamount to blasphemy.

As far as respect for country, one must ask what is our country.  Is it some mega country covering tens of thousands of square miles or is it our community or our area? When Robert E. Lee fought for his country, it was not the Confederacy, but his home state of Virginia.  When Lee surrendered at Appomattox, it was the beginning of the end for this nation.  We are now an empire that does not stand for liberty of any sort, but for materialism. statism, abortions and a general hubris that has been discussed so well by men like Michael Scheuer, Ralph Raico, Robert Higgs , Joe Sobran and William Grigg.

Andrew Bacevich opened his book “Breach of Trust: How Americans Failed Their Soldiers and Their Country,” with an illustration on how the flag had been elevated to god-like status and that the National Anthem is part of the new civic religion.

Kaepernick might be wrong in his motives, but there are many in America that have the feeling that something is terribly wrong with this country.   I Samuel 8 is a perfect illustration on how a people refuse to abide by the standards of God and instead put their trust and faith in a king to rule over the land.  We do not have a God-honoring nation anymore so why the fuss over someone not standing for a national anthem.

 

The New Thirty Years War…and then some

Here is my latest book review.  It is Andrew Bacevich’s new book on the history of the War in the Greater Middle which can be purchased here.

Andrew Bacevich has written a brilliant history in a nutshell of our adventures in the greater Middle East which began in earnest with President Carter’s aiding Afghan rebels against the Soviets in 1980. Since that time we have gone from one intervention to another in ensuring that we have access to oil and project the American dominance over the world as the sole superpower.

Bacevich shows us that the vacillation on the part of our leaders and disrupting the lives of many people in that part of the world in many instances have cost numerous lives there, resulted in the maiming and killing of many of our soldiers and has put a tremendous drain on our government budgets over the last 30 years. Events in Iran, Bosnia, Kosovo, Afghanistan, Somalia and many other countries are discussed with brief yet precise aplomb. Iran-Contra for instance is shown by the author as an instance where we were on both sides which the government did in the Iran-Iraq War in the 1980s. The author breaks down the Gulf War in four phases. The aforementioned Gulf War of the 1980s, the conflict in Desert Storm in 1991-1992, the toppling of Saddam Hussein in 2003 and the recent conflict with ISIS. In essence, this has been the new Thirty Years War and the result has been hundreds of thousands of dead, broken infrastructure, massive division of countries and bitterness from locals. Today, as Bacevich notes, the American people no longer want to hear about incidents in that part of the world, preferring to put such things down the memory hole. Yet, the fight still rages on and will do so for years to come.

Bacevich gives four sound reasons for the war in the greater Middle East being perpetrated with no end in sight. The first reason is that neither party has a strong anti-war or anti-interventionist wing within their parties; this should be a surprise to many. The second is that many candidates prefer to “support the troops” than to question the reasons for the war’s continuation. The third reason, the most sinister in my opinion, is that some sectors of the government and private sector benefit financially from the war’s continuance. The final reason is that American citizens seem not to care and that they wish for deficit spending to cover this campaign and lay the debts on future generations. As the author concludes his book, he states that Americans are in a deep slumber and that they are in for a rude awakening. I couldn’t agree more.

A Giant in Bravery and Courage

This is a review of a book that I just posted on Amazon on the experiences of Witold Pilecki, a Polish army officer who volunteered to go to Auschwitz:

In an era where the word “hero” is bandied about a little too much, one can go back to an era where bravery and heroism was done by people who went above and beyond the call of duty.  In this book, the report of Captain Witold Pilecki on his experiences in the Auschwitz concentration camp in what is now western Poland is told with stunning clarity and anguish. 

By intentionally involving himself in a roundup by SS officers, he undertook a mission to go inside Auschwitz to see how the camp was being run and to buildup resistance among the Poles who were detained there. Throughout the report, he told of great hardship where “capos” and SS men were extraordinarily cruel to the prisoners where men were put into “commandos” and essentially worked to death (finished off).  Pilecki survived in part by conserving his energy during the ordeal and using his wits to obtain better jobs in the camp that involve lighter labor.

He recorded all of the great horrors of the camp including Soviet prisoners being exterminated all at once with gas and men and women being given phenol injections to procure agonizing deaths.  Others were given too little of the drug and were burned alive in the oven.  Jews were the main targets of these atrocities, but Poles, Ukrainians, Czechs and to a certain extent Catholic priests had a share in this horror.

After being informed that he might be sent to a harsher camp where he might not survive, he planned his escape in April 1943 and accomplished it with a large amount of suspense and drama.  He escaped to the “General government” area east of Krakow where he met men of the Polish Home Army and reported his findings.   The final tragedy was to come several years later at the hands of his own countrymen who embraced the Soviet government and tried him as a spy.  Nonetheless, this story which is contained in this book should be read by all who look for men who were giants.   A brilliant book with a short introduction and informative appendices.