London Calling

In an event that very few thought was possible, the people of Great Britain voted to secede from the European Union yesterday which sent shockwaves across the world.  The vote to Leave not only was prevalent in the rural areas of England, Wales and parts of Northern Ireland, but also in areas of solid leftist support such as Sunderland, Wigan, Leeds, Birmingham and Stockton-on-Tees in the north of England.  Many of these areas have seen massive decline in their industries such as coal, steel and shipbuilding that was the backbone of Labor support in the 20th Century.  Many people in those areas saw the current governmental structure as one where prosperity was limited only to the wealthy areas of Central London.

Many in Britain were fed up with the lack of representation in the European Parliament where decisions were being made not by their representatives, but by unelected bureaucrats that made rules and regulations by decree.  Another thought one must consider.  It is impossible to get a sense of what the population wants when you have a government like the EU that makes decisions for almost 500 million people.  With this vote, the people of Britain have a chance to develop a form of representation that is a bit more manageable through their parliament at Westminster.  A British MP represents about 70,000 people as opposed to an MEP in the European Parliament where each member represents an average of 700,000 in Strasbourg.

Nicola Strugeon, the leader of the Scottish National Party stated yesterday that she wants a referendum on secession of Scotland from the whole of Britain in order to rejoin the EU.  To that I say “let them go.”  Self-determination is now the hot item.  Perhaps the contagion might spread to our shores where the voice of the people is slowly being crushed by the dictates of unelected bureaucrats and unelected judges in Washington.  Can a “Texit” be that far into the future?

Kirpatrick Sale is an advocate of small government not only on its size, but also on its land coverage.  He stated: “The virtue of small government is that the mistakes are small as well…If you want to leave a nation you think is corrupt, inefficient, militaristic, oppressive, repressive, but you don’t want to move to Canada or France, what do you do? Well, the way is through secession, where you could stay home and be where you want to be.”  The genie is out of the bottle.  Let liberty reign.

Orlando, the way it used to was

Much has happened in the City of Orlando and all of it has not been good.  Shootings and a child towed under by an alligator has given the city a black eye that has tarnished its image as the City Beautiful.  The city has grown into an entertainment mecca with theme parks and a clubs all over the place.  Such modernity might be the in thing now, but it seems that the city lost a bit of its magic from the good ole days.

When I went to Naval Nuclear Power School in Orlando back in 1982, the city was still a sleepy southern town with a county population of just under 500,000 people.   There was Walt Disney World, but that was pretty much about it as far as theme parks were concerned until the opening of Epcot in October of that year.  Wet n’ Wild was the major water park where you could get in for $10 and the only nightlife in the town was Church Street Station which consisted of a few bars and from what I have read closed its doors almost 20 years ago.  I took the bus a couple of times around Orlando, but the bus service ended around 7:00 p.m. as most people stayed at home to spend their evenings cooking meals and listening to country music on WHOO radio.   Yes, there is so much more to do there now, but the hectic pace of going from one park to another and dancing the night away seems inadequate to filling the void left in the soul of man.

Perhaps it is time for people to set back and reflect on the meaning of culture and taking a break from the hustle and bustle or the rat race.  Yes, the past might be somewhat silly according to this video, but it seems that families played together and stayed together and the pace was slow.  Hopefully, places can once again become communities where people can associate with each without other things crowding out the natural growth of relationships.  As Robert Nisbet said in his book “The Quest for Community” :

Other and more powerful forms of association have existed, but the major moral and psychological influences on the individual’s life have emanated from the family and local community and the church. Within such groups have been engendered the primary types of identification: affection, friendship, prestige, recognition. And within them also have been engendered or intensified the principal incentives of work, love, prayer, and devotion to freedom and order.

The Orlando of the past is gone and we cannot go back.  However, it is not too late to preserve what’s left of the old culture where family, church and community was paramount.  Let’s choose the right future.

The wisdom of Erik von Kuehnelt-Leddihn

The stage is now set for the General Election in November with Donald Trump going against Hillary Clinton in the Presidential race.  Once again, many people on both sides of the ideological spectrum are proclaiming this election the most important election in our lifetimes.  This line is bandied about because the office of the President is a very powerful position that decides how the executive agencies are run and what nominees are named to the Supreme Court and the lower courts.  Many are fearful that actions by such a powerful person would lead to the diminution of their liberties.

The question we should ask ourselves is how could just one person have so much power over our lives.  The answer shockingly enough lies within the voting public that elected people in the past that amassed power to themselves.  Among this group of people were many Presidents.  This trend is not new.  Erik von Kuehnelt-Leddhin wrote various books on the dangers of democracy in three books, Liberty or Equality, Menace of the Herd and Leftism.    In them, he excoriates democratic rule which he calls very unstable and leads to tyranny and centralization.  He notes that Revolutionary France was the wellspring of many of the problems that faces people today as the result of government power.  No doubt Kuehnelt-Leddhin would have agreed with Lord Acton that democracy generally monopolizes and concentrates power.    The wealth of quotes from this man are full of wisdom and eye opening.  They include the following:

Even 51 per cent of a nation can establish a totalitarian and dictatorial règime, suppress minorities, and still remain democratic; there is, as we have said, little doubt that the American Congress and the French Chambre have a power over their respective nations which would rouse the envy of a Louis XIV or a George III were they alive today.

Democratism and its allied herd movements, while remaining loyal to the principle of equality and identity, will never hesitate to sacrifice liberty.

Fifty-one percent of a nation can establish a totalitarian regime, suppress minorities and still remain democratic.

Indeed, it seems that the more we vote, the less freedom we have.  We should wake up and call for mass de-centralization of power and abolition of many of the central agencies like the CIA, FBI, ATF, NSA and TSA that have corroded our liberties.   Perhaps the upcoming Brexit vote in Great Britain will give us a ray of hope.